Month: April 2015

The Story of the ZX Spectrum in Pixels (volumes 1 & 2)

Back in late 2014, Chris Wilkins approached me to write a “memoir” for his upcoming book, “The Story of the ZX Spectrum in Pixels: VOLUME 1.

The book, which launched in December 2014, was the result of a successful Kickstarter campaign, and per Chris’s Fusionretrobooks.com site:

The book, ‘The Story of the ZX Spectrum in Pixels‘, is 236 pages in length and finished to the very same high standard adopted for ‘The History of Ocean Software‘ and ‘The Story of U.S. Gold‘ publications . The ‘ Sinclair’ logo on the front cover is embossed making the book a desirable addition to any gaming fan or book collector

The book is predominantly a visual journey charting the best games on the ZX Spectrum from 1982 onwards until the early 90’s. Each spread contains a large iconic image of the game and is accompanied by artwork from the inlay, the game’s advertisement where available and further game screens showing the loading screen, menu etc.

We have also interviewed over 19 programmers, artists and musicians to get their view on the Spectrum and how it helped launch their careers into gaming including Rick Dickinson, the man who designed the Sinclair range of computers.

It’s an excellent read (my contribution notwithstanding), and recommended to anyone interested in the retro gaming scene (and specifically the Sinclair ZX Spectrum). Volume 2 is now well underway and available for preorder, having again been successfully Kickstarted, and I’m personally looking forward to reading it!

To (possibly) whet your appetite, here’s an extract from my contribution to volume 1:

The next year, back home in Barnsley, I bought a 16K Sinclair ZX Spectrum and 13” black & white TV, total price £200 in 1983 money from WH Smiths, with a lot of help from my Mum. My early recollections, upon acquiring the Spectrum, are spending hours and hours loading and exploring the Horizons tape, and then playing Manic Miner, Lunar Jetman and then later Atic Atac. I bought the Spectrum primarily due to my interest in electronic music, but pretty soon I was trying to figure out how to make games in Z80. I remember disassembling Time Gate by Quicksilver, and the minor epiphany when I finally understood LDIR for block byte copies. Thanks John Hollis!

 

Posted by Steve Wetherill in Amstrad, CPC 464, Retro, Sinclair, Spectrum, Z80, 0 comments