Month: February 2014

Northern British Sayings #4: Thee/Thou/Thy/Thine

As a kid, growing up in Yorkshire, and especially when I moved to the town of Barnsley, it was typical for people to use the following words:

  • Thee. Meaning, “you”. Example, “Does that belong to thee?” Does that belong to you?
  • Thou. Meaning, “you”. Usually abbreviated to “tha” (like the a in “cat”) or “thar” (similar the arr in “arrow”). Example, “What tha/thar doin’?” Or, what are you doing?
  • Thy. Meaning, “your”. Usually abbreviated/pronounced “thi” (like the i in “pig”). Example, “Put thi coat on.” Or, put your coat on.
  • Thine. Meaning, belonging to you, “yours”. Example, “Is that thine?” Is that yours?

When I have related this information to friends in the US, I think typically people think I am exaggerating, or even making it up. Growing up in Barnsley in 1970’s and 1980’s, I swear that it was the norm to use these forms rather than you/your/yours.

Interestingly, in Sheffield these words tend to be pronounced as “dee” instead of “thee” and “dar” instead of “thar”. This leads Barnsley folks to refer to Sheffield natives as “dee-dars“.

Wikipedia has a page on these (generally) archaic forms, going into the technical distinctions.

Posted by Steve Wetherill in Yorkshire Slang, 3 comments

Northern British Sayings #3: Lake

When I was about 12, my family moved from Sheffield to Barnsley. The distance between the two towns is about 15 miles, and they are both in the county of South Yorkshire. I’d expected slight differences in accent and dialect, but I did not expect to to hear completely new words (or at least new usage).

During the first week in my new school (St Helens Comprehensive), one of the other lads in my math class turned to me and said, “Does tha lake footy?” Ignoring for now the use of “tha” (meaning “you”, a contraction of the old English “thou”), my interpretation of this question was, “Do you like football?” A reasonable enough question. I answered, “Yes, it’s OK.” My questioner became visibly a little irritated at this answer, and repeated his question, more insistently this time, “Naw, does tha lake footy?” We repeated this cycle for a bit, ultimately leaving the matter unresolved.

I simply did not know what he meant, I thought perhaps he was looking to stir up some trouble, maybe this was the class bully?

Later, I learned that the word “lake” is used in Barnsley (though not in Sheffield) as a synonym for “play”. So, he was simply asking, “Do you play football?”

Posted by Steve Wetherill in Yorkshire Slang, 5 comments

Northern British Sayings #2: Snicket/Ginnel/Gennel

A “snicket” is an alleyway or passageway, and in Barnsley in South Yorkshire the word is used to mean a path, typically between fences or walls, in an open space or field, or between gardens.

A “ginnel” pronounced (pronounced with a hard “g” as in “gun”) is again an alleyway or passageway, but it the term is generally (in Barnsley) used to refer to a gap between houses (for example), or between buildings.

In Sheffield (some fifteen full miles away from Barnsley, but still in Yorkshire), these words are not used, but the alternative word “gennel” (pronounced “jennel”) is used.

Any other local variations? Please comment!

Posted by Steve Wetherill in Yorkshire Slang, 9 comments

Cool Introduction to Puppet YouTube Video

We use Puppet @ work, and since I’m not the one who typically administers the system I wanted to learn more about it. I found this pretty cool introduction video on YouTube, which goes through the basics of what Puppet is, and then steps you through creating a couple of AWS VM’s, and then setting up a Puppet Master and Puppet Agent. I followed along with all the steps, and was so impressed by how clearly everything was explained that I thought I’d link the video here.

Posted by Steve Wetherill in Puppet, 0 comments

Cool introduction to Puppet YouTube video

We use Puppet @ work, and since I’m not the one who typically administers the system I wanted to learn more about it. I found this pretty cool introduction video on YouTube, which goes through the basics of what Puppet is, and then steps you through creating a couple of AWS VM’s, and then setting up a Puppet Master and Puppet Agent. I followed along with all the steps, and was so impressed by how clearly everything was explained that I thought I’d link the video here.

Posted by Steve Wetherill in Puppet, 0 comments

Northern British Sayings #1: Ha’porth

Been thinking about this for a while, so here goes. For the amusement,  amazement or probably just the general bemusement of all, I present the first in a series of, “Northern British Sayings”. Could be just a word, or maybe an expression. Probably some dialect things. I’m going to give my interpretation of these, be interesting to hear alternatives in the comments. Since I am a Yorkshireman, my interpretation will generally have a “Yorkshire” perspective. Yes, these are things that people actually say, today (for the benefit of my American friends). 🙂

#1 Ha’porth 

As in, “He doesn’t have an ha’porth of sense.” Or, “You daft ha’porth.”

Pronounced, “aye-peth”, this is a contraction of “Half-penny worth”. So, “He doesn’t have a half-penny worth of sense.”

Incidentally, a half-penny is known as an “ha’penny”, pronounced “aye-penny”. 

Posted by Steve Wetherill in Yorkshire Slang, 5 comments

Interview from 2012 on El Mundo del Spectrum

Check out this interview posted on the World of Spectrum site about my time at Odin Computer Graphics. The interview was originally posted in Spanish on the elmundodelspectrum.com site in May 2012, but I’ve never linked it from here.

Screen Shot 2014-02-16 at 1.22.44 AM

Posted by Steve Wetherill in Interview, Retro, Sinclair, Spectrum, 0 comments

Abandonware

Today saw the appearance of an article about the ZX Spectrum Bluetooth Keyboard in the Grauniad technology blog, courtesy of @alexhern.

While I have slight concerns over the title (the Kickstarter was not stalled, and in fact was successfully funded), the article contains an interesting angle on the issue of older games, and brings up the topic of “abandonware”.

When Alex pinged me for some quotes for his article, he asked me about abandonware, and my comments are contained in the article and excerpted here:

AH: While many gamers may think that software as old as that shipped by Elite Systems is somehow in the public domain, the truth is that games are covered by copyright in just the same way – and for just the same time – as other creative works.

“Older games are sometimes treated as ‘abandonware’”, says Wetherill, “which is an invented term used to justify the copying of games.

“I think people sometimes have the sense of, ‘I bought that game in 1985, why should I pay for it again’, but in that respect I think games are not really much different to other media – you can’t play your old vinyl records on a CD player, you have to buy the CD. On the whole though, in this case most feedback seems sympathetic.”

Some have taken exception to my definition of abandonware, but my point really is that if official versions of older titles are available commercially (through an emulator, say), and if you lose your original copy or if you can’t use it any more (in this case, because the good old Sinclair Speccy is obsolete), then it seems reasonable to expect players to cough up a couple of bucks for the supported version.

Posted by Steve Wetherill in Retro, Sinclair, Spectrum, 0 comments

Nodes of Yesod Music Remixes

Since I’ve been covering various game music remixes here I thought I’d post these links to remixes of the Nodes of Yesod music. The original music was by Fred Gray,  these versions originate in the iOS version of the game (the 25th Anniversary Edition).

I’ve included a couple of tracks, firstly, the main “theme” music. This version was created by Julien Nevo in MIDI format, to which I added instrumentation and production for this PCM version:



And then the in game “Moon Music” by Matti Paalanen:


Posted by Steve Wetherill in Music, Retro, Sinclair, Spectrum, 0 comments